The Commitment Phobe

Most Kuwaiti women are purposeful in a sense that they most likely won’t involve themselves in a relationship if the intentions weren’t clear from the start. And by intentions, I mean love, marriage, and a baby carriage.
Sure, not all women are looking for marriage or kids, but being in a stable, healthy, and happy relationship is honestly one of the few joys living in Kuwait has left to offer. It’s nice to take care of someone and be taken care of, and to feel a sense of security and excitement while everything else seems so mundane.

Being in a relationship is fun. You get to discover the person you’re with, and they surprise you every day (in good ways and bad ways!), and you get to understand yourself better. It’s the absolute best when you find your heart-twin, soulmate, best friend, etc.
Eventually the quiet storm evolves into a hurricane of emotions, and you find yourself thinking about him/her before you go to sleep, wondering what it’d be like to wake up by their side, live life together, start a family, what your kids would look like… The whole nine yards.

When you get caught up in those emotions and thoughts, it is inevitable that you’d want to find out if your partner feels the same way. So you ask. And then, more often than not, you get hit with the piano-out-of-the-sky response that crushes every last bit of your matrimonial imagination:
“I don’t want to get married.”

Here, you have two options; you either prod and ask why and formulate a plan in your head to change his mind, or you can go home and cry about it and ride along with the relationship till you give up.

Both are shitty options. I know. Almost every guy I’ve dated has given me the same response, and I know it’s not because of me.
It’s because of our society and the way they look at marriage. It’s because of how expensive being married is, even if you’re the type of woman that doesn’t want gifts or lavish vacations or a fancy apartment. You just want security. You want a best friend to grow old with.

We understand that finding a decent, well-priced apartment is difficult. We understand that you want to be financially secure before you feel responsible for another person. We understand that sometimes you like your space and want to hang out with your buddies. A happy, healthy marriage with the right person isn’t a ball-and-chain, or a golden cage. It’s your life, just the way it is, with another version of yourself that loves you and wants to add value to your days.

I hate that something so beautiful and natural has developed one of the worst reputations in our society because everyone decided to focus on the financial demands that come with marriage rather than realize all the great benefits that you don’t even have to pay a single fils for.
I know women that have gotten married to men they love without asking for a mahar (dowry) or a shabka (expensive jewelry set) or a wedding.

The fact that it is becoming more difficult to find someone who isn’t afraid of commitment is making Kuwaiti women less keen on dating.

Why are men so afraid of settling down? What could ultimately change the negative ideologies that are associated with marriage and commitment? Do any of you face these fears? What are you doing to tackle them?

Standard

Hotel, Motel, Holiday Inn!

Sorry I’ve been on hiatus, guys. Too much going on (good things!) and I haven’t found the time to write.

Let’s get personal.

As a Kuwaiti female who dates and deals with the stresses of everyday life, sometimes you just want to unwind. With or without your significant other. (This goes for men too, by the way, but I’m a woman so I’ll write from my perspective.)
There aren’t any places to my knowledge where I can hang out in a bathrobe, order room service, watch trash TV, and run a hot bath while listening to my favorite songs. With or without my significant other.

Booking a hotel room for some privacy and intimate time feels like one of the hardest missions in Kuwait. Why is that? I get society’s whole we-can’t-sleep-together thing, but what if we just want a quiet place to relax where we can guarantee that we won’t be interrupted, stared at, or arrested? What if we just want to cuddle in our sweats and eat pizza? Where do we go?

I once dated someone, and it was so serious that my parents were fine with him coming over for lunch or dinner, or coming by to watch a movie and hang out on the couch. It was wonderful, but after our relationship went sour, I realized that it was best to never let that happen again.

Other relationships I’ve been in have been nothing more than a hunt for a place to hang out, since sometimes we aren’t in the mood to go out to eat or drive around.

How do you go about spending private time with your boyfriend/girlfriend?

Standard